Photo 20 Feb 33,944 notes missfolly:

Lotte Jacobi: Albert Einstein, 1938

missfolly:

Lotte Jacobi: Albert Einstein, 1938

via Miss Folly.
Photo 20 Feb
Photo 16 Oct 14,329 notes
Photo 1 Sep 541 notes septagonstudios:

Rod Luff

septagonstudios:

Rod Luff

Quote 1 Sep 349 notes
Among other things, you’ll find that you’re not the first person who was ever confused and frightened and even sickened by human behavior. You’re by no means alone on that score, you’ll be excited and stimulated to know. Many, many men have been just as troubled morally and spiritually as you are right now. Happily, some of them kept records of their troubles. You’ll learn from them—if you want to. Just as someday, if you have something to offer, someone will learn something from you. It’s a beautiful reciprocal arrangement. And it isn’t education. It’s history. It’s poetry.
— J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye. (via ruineshumaines)
Photo 24 Aug 726 notes neuropsy:

Motion After-effect Optical Illusion
So I’ve noticed that under the #gif tag there is this ‘dopey’ optical illusion. The comment below it says:

 
Stare into the middle of this for 45 seconds, (look around) and you will feel the effects of LSD.
OMG FREE DRUGS

 
That’s cool, but you know what is even cooler? The science behind it! (you are now aware of the fact that there is a science behind these things).
AWESOME! So… how does it work?
The thing is called motion after-effect and it can be explained in terms of “fatigue” of the neurons encoding one motion direction. Neurons coding a particular movement reduce their responses with time of exposure to a constantly moving object, causing a neural adaptation.
Another example ot this effect is known as the waterfall illusion. If you will look at a waterfall for about a minute and then look at the stationary rocks at the side of the waterfall, these rocks will appear to be moving upwards slightly.
One theory is that perception of stationary objects, for example rocks beside a waterfall, is coded as the balance among the baseline responses of neurons coding all possible directions of motion. Neural adaptation of neurons stimulated by downwards movement reduces their baseline activity, tilting the balance in favor of upwards movement.
One point for science!
More at my Optical Illusions Explained page.

neuropsy:

Motion After-effect Optical Illusion

So I’ve noticed that under the #gif tag there is this ‘dopey’ optical illusion. The comment below it says:

Stare into the middle of this for 45 seconds, (look around) and you will feel the effects of LSD.

OMG FREE DRUGS

That’s cool, but you know what is even cooler? The science behind it! (you are now aware of the fact that there is a science behind these things).

AWESOME! So… how does it work?

The thing is called motion after-effect and it can be explained in terms of “fatigue” of the neurons encoding one motion direction. Neurons coding a particular movement reduce their responses with time of exposure to a constantly moving object, causing a neural adaptation.

Another example ot this effect is known as the waterfall illusion. If you will look at a waterfall for about a minute and then look at the stationary rocks at the side of the waterfall, these rocks will appear to be moving upwards slightly.

One theory is that perception of stationary objects, for example rocks beside a waterfall, is coded as the balance among the baseline responses of neurons coding all possible directions of motion. Neural adaptation of neurons stimulated by downwards movement reduces their baseline activity, tilting the balance in favor of upwards movement.

One point for science!

More at my Optical Illusions Explained page.

via loldit.
Photo 23 Aug 1,762 notes
via .
Photo 20 Aug 3,178 notes
via .
Photo 16 Aug 301 notes ruineshumaines:

Eyes Of A Night Owl (by left-hand)

ruineshumaines:

Eyes Of A Night Owl (by left-hand)

Photo 15 Aug
Photo 15 Aug 2 notes intermolecular:

Kisanthobia ariasi - green oak jewel beetle (focus stacked portrait) by nikolarahme on Flickr.
via .
Photo 10 Aug 375 notes 14-billion-years-later:

X ray of a Viper Moray. Check out the teeth.

14-billion-years-later:

X ray of a Viper Moray. Check out the teeth.

Photo 10 Aug 19,205 notes
via True.
Photo 8 Aug
Photo 8 Aug 69,215 notes

(Source: liquidatomicgonads)


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